Journal Articles

The current epidemiology and clinical decisions surrounding acute respiratory infections

September 05, 2014

The current epidemiology and clinical decisions surrounding acute respiratory infections Trends Mol Med. 2014 Sep 5, Zaas AK1, Garner BH2, Tsalik EL3, Burke T2, Woods CW3, Ginsburg GS2.

  • Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA; Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA. Electronic address: aimee.zaas@duke.edu.
  • 2Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA.
  • 3Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA; Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA; Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.

Abstract

Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is a common diagnosis in outpatient and emergent care settings. Currently available diagnostics are limited, creating uncertainty in the use of antibacterial, antiviral, or supportive care. Up to 72% of ambulatory care patients with ARI are treated with an antibacterial, despite only a small fraction actually needing one. Antibiotic overuse is not restricted to ambulatory care: ARI accounts for approximately 5 million emergency department (ED) visits annually in the USA, where 52-61% of such patients receive antibiotics. Thus, an accurate test for the presence or absence of viral or bacterial infection is needed. In this review, we focus on recent research showing that the host-response (genomic, proteomic, or miRNA) can accomplish this task.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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