Journal Articles

Signatures of anthocyanin metabolites identified in humans inhibit biomarkers of vascular inflammation in human endothelial cells

May 25, 2017

Emily F. Warner, Michael J. Smith, Qingzhi Zhang, K. Saki Raheem, David O’Hagan, Maria A. O’Connell, Colin D. Kay (2017). Signatures of anthocyanin metabolites identified in humans inhibit biomarkers of vascular inflammation in human endothelial cells. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research.

Author Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Norwich Medical School, Bob Champion Research and Education Building, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom

School of Pharmacy, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom

School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom

School of Chemistry, St. Andrews University, Fife, Scotland, United Kingdom

Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Westminster, London, United Kingdom

Food Bioprocessing & Nutrition Sciences, Plants for Human Health Institute, North Carolina State University, Kannapolis, United States of America

Abstract

Scope

The physiological relevance of contemporary cell culture studies is often perplexing, given the use of unmetabolized phytochemicals at supraphysiological concentrations. We investigated the activity of physiologically relevant anthocyanin metabolite signatures, derived from a previous pharmacokinetics study of 500 mg 13C5-cyanidin-3-glucoside in 8 healthy participants, on soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in human endothelial cells.
Methods and results

Signatures of peak metabolites (previously identified at 1, 6 and 24 h post-bolus) were reproduced using pure standards and effects were investigated across concentrations ten-fold lower and higher than observed mean ( Conclusion

Signatures of anthocyanin metabolites following dietary consumption reduce VCAM-1 and IL-6 production, providing evidence of physiologically relevant biological activity.

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