Journal Articles

Serum uric acid concentrations and SLC2A9 genetic variation in Hispanic children: the Viva La Familia Study

February 02, 2015

Serum uric acid concentrations and SLC2A9 genetic variation in Hispanic children: the Viva La Familia Study, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition,  V Saroja VorugantiSandra LastonKarin HaackNitesh R MehtaShelley A ColeNancy F Butte, and Anthony G Comuzzie

  1. From the Department of Nutrition (VSV) and UNC Nutrition Research Institute (VSV), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kannapolis, NC; the Department of Genetics, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (SL, KH, SAC, and AGC); and the USDA/Agricultural Research Service Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (NRM and NFB).

Serum uric acid concentrations and SLC2A9 genetic variation in Hispanic children: the Viva La Familia Study

Abstract

Background: Elevated concentrations of serum uric acid are associated with increased risk of gout and renal and cardiovascular diseases. Genetic studies in adults have consistently identified associations of solute carrier family 2, member 9 (SLC2A9), polymorphisms with variation in serum uric acid. However, it is not known whether the association of serum uric acid with SLC2A9 polymorphisms manifests in children.

Objective: The aim was to investigate whether variation in serum uric acid is under genetic influence and whether the association with SLC2A9 polymorphisms generalizes to Hispanic children of the Viva La Familia Study.

Design: We conducted a genomewide association study with 1.1 million genetic markers in 815 children.

Results: We found serum uric acid to be significantly heritable [h2 ± SD = 0.45 ± 0.08, P = 5.8 × 10−11] and associated with SLC2A9 variants (P values between 10−16 and 10−7). Several of the significantly associated polymorphisms were previously identified in studies in adults. We also found positive genetic correlations between serum uric acid and BMI z score (ρG = 0.45, P = 0.002), percentage of body fat (ρG = 0.28, P = 0.04), fat mass (ρG = 0.34, P = 0.02), waist circumference (ρG = 0.42, P = 0.003) and waist-to-height ratio (ρG = 0.46, P = 0.001).

Conclusions: Our results show that variation in serum uric acid in Hispanic children is under considerable genetic influence and is associated with obesity-related phenotypes. As in adults, genetic variation in SLC2A9 is associated with serum uric acid concentrations, an important biomarker of renal and cardiovascular disease risk, in Hispanic children.

 

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