Journal Articles

Potato phenolics impact starch digestion and glucose transport in model systems but translation to phenolic rich potato chips results in only modest modification of glycemic response in humans.

June 21, 2018

Moser S1, Aragon I1, Furrer A1, Van Klinken JW2, Kaczmarczyk M2, Lee BH3, George J4, Hamaker BR3, Mattes R4, Ferruzzi MG5. Potato phenolics impact starch digestion and glucose transport in model systems but translation to phenolic rich potato chips results in only modest modification of glycemic response in humans. Nutr Res. 2018 Apr;52:57-70. doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2018.02.001.

Author information

1 Dept of Food Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.

2 PepsiCo, PepsiCo Global R&D.

3 Dept of Food Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Whistler Center for Carbohydrate Research, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.

4 Dept of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.

5 Dept of Food Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Whistler Center for Carbohydrate Research, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Dept of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN. Electronic address: mferruz@ncsu.edu.

 

Abstract

Beneficial effects of some phenolic compounds in modulation of carbohydrate digestion and glycemic response have been reported, however effects of phenolics from processed potato products on these endpoints are not well known. The aims of this study were to characterize phenolic profiles of fresh potatoes (purple, red, or white fleshed; 2 varieties each) and chips, and to examine the potential for potato phenolic extracts (PPE) to modulate starch digestion and intestinal glucose transport in model systems. Following in vitro assessment, a pilot clinical study (n=11) assessed differences in glycemic response and gastric emptying between chips from pigmented and white potatoes. We hypothesized that phenolics from pigmented potato chips would be recovered through processing and result in a reduced acute glycemic response in humans relative to chips made from white potatoes. PPEs were rich in anthocyanins (~98, 11 and ND mg/100 g dw) and chlorogenic acids (~519, 425 and 157 mg/100 g dw) for purple, red and white varieties respectively. While no significant effects were observed on starch digestion by α-amylase and the α-glucosidases, PPEs significantly (p<0.05) decreased the rate of glucose transport, measured following transport of 1,2,3,4,5,6,6-d7 -glucose (d7-glu) across Caco-2 human intestinal cell monolayers, by 4.5-83.9%. Consistent with in vitro results, consumption of purple potato chips modestly but significantly (p<0.05) decreased blood glucose at 30 and 60 minutes post consumption compared to white chips without impacting gastric emptying. These results suggest that potato phenolics may play a modest role in modulation of glycemic response and these effects may result in subtle differences between consumer products.

 

KEYWORDS:

Anthocyanins; Chlorogenic acid; Glucose transport; Glycemic Response; Potatoes; Starch Digestion

 

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