Journal Articles

Isolation and linkage mapping of NBS-LRR resistance gene analogs in red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) and classification among 270 Rosaceae NBS-LRR genes

October 13, 2008

Isolation and linkage mapping of NBS-LRR resistance gene analogs in red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) and classification among 270 Rosaceae NBS-LRR genes

Abstract

Plant R genes confer resistance to pathogens in a gene-for-gene mode. Seventy-five putative resistance gene analogs (RGAs) containing conserved domains were cloned from Rubus idaeus L. cv. ‘Latham’ using degenerate primers based on RGAs identified in Rosaceae species. The sequences were compared to 195 RGA sequences identified from five Rosaceae family genera. Multiple sequence alignments showed high similarity at multiple nucleotide-binding site (NBS) motifs with homology to Drosophila Toll and mammalian interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) and non-TIR RNBSA-A motifs. The TIR sequences clustered separately from the non-TIR sequences with a bootstrap value of 76%. There were 11 clusters each of TIR and non-TIR type sequences of multiple genera with bootstrap values of more than 50%, including nine with values of more than 75% and seven of more than 90%. Polymorphic sequence characterized amplified region and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers were developed for nine Rubus RGA sequences with eight placed on a red raspberry genetic linkage map. Phylogenetic analysis indicated four of the mapped sequences share sequence similarity to groupTIR I, while three others were spread in non-TIR groups. Of the 75 Rubus RGA sequences analyzed, members were placed in five TIR groups and six non-TIR groups. These group classifications closely matched those in 12 of 13 studies from which these sequences were derived. The analysis of related DNA sequences within plant families elucidates the evolutionary relationship and process involved in pest resistance development in plants. This information will aid in the understanding of R genes and their proliferation within plant genomes.

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