Journal Articles

The Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel: A Resource for Systems Genetics Analyses of Metabolic and Cardiovascular Traits

April 26, 2016

Aldons J. Lusis 1,*, Marcus Seldin 2, Hooman Allayee 3, Brian J Bennett 4, Mete Civelek 5, Richard C. Davis 6, Eleazar Eskin 2, Charles Farber 5, Simon T Hui 2, Margarete Mehrabian 2, Frode Norheim 2, Calvin Pan 2, Brian Parks 7, Christoph Rau 2, Desmond J. Smith 2, Thomas Vallim 2, Yibin Wang 2 and Jessica Wang 2 (2016). The Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel: A Resource for Systems Genetics Analyses of Metabolic and Cardiovascular Traits. Journal of Lipid Research, 57(4).

Author Affiliations

1 UCLA School of Medicine, United States;
2 UCLA, United States;
3 USC Keck School of Medicine, United States;
4 University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, United States;
5 University of Virginia, United States;
6 University of California, Los Angeles; Division of Cardiology, United States;
7 University of Wisconsin, United States

Abstract

The Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP) is a collection of approximately 100 well-characterized inbred strains of mice that can be used to analyze the genetic and environmental factors underlying complex traits. While not nearly as powerful for mapping genetic loci contributing to the traits as human Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), it has some important advantages. First, environmental factors can be controlled. Second, relevant tissues are accessible for global molecular phenotyping. Finally, because inbred strains are renewable, results from separate studies can be integrated. Thus far, the HMDP has been studied for traits relevant to obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, osteoporosis, heart failure, immune regulation, fatty liver disease, and host-gut microbiota interactions. High-throughput technologies have been used to examine the genomes, epigenomes, transcriptomes, proteomes, metabolomes, and microbiomes of the mice under various environmental conditions. All of the published data are available and can be readily used to formulate hypotheses about genes, pathways and interactions.

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