Journal Articles

Allergenicity of Roasted Peanuts Treated with a Non-Human Digestive Protease

January 16, 2015

Allergenicity of Roasted Peanuts Treated with a Non-Human Digestive Protease, Food Research International, 16Jan2015,  Jianmei Yua, , ,Michelle Hernandezd,Hao Lib, e,Ipek Goktepec,Carole Robinetted,Amy Auerbachd,David Pedend,Mohamed Ahmednac

  • a Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411
  • b Center for Excellence in Post-Harvest Technologies, North Carolina Research Campus, Kannapolis, NC 28081, USA
  • c Department of Health Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar
  • d University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine
  • e College of Biological Science and Technology, Fuzhou University, 350108, China

Allergenicity of Roasted Peanuts Treated with a Non-Human Digestive Protease

Abstract

Peanut allergy is a severe and lifelong type of food allergy triggered by allergenic proteins and peptides in peanuts. This study investigated the effects of ultrasound-assisted alcalase treatment on the concentrations of major allergenic proteins (Ara h 1 and Ara h 2) in roasted peanut kernels and the allergenicity of treated peanut extracts. Peanut kernels were sonicated for 1 hour in buffer solution, incubated with different amount of alcalase for various time, then vacuum dried. The variations of Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 contents in soluble and insoluble portions of peanuts treatments were evaluated by sandwich ELISA and SDS-PAGE, respectively. The in vitro IgE-binding capacity of treated peanut extracts was determined by a competitive inhibition ELISA using pooled plasma of 10 peanut allergic patients. Samples with lower in vitro IgE-binding were used for human skin prick tests (SPTs) in peanut allergic individuals. Results indicate that alcalase digestion of sonicated peanuts significantly increased protein solubility while decreasing Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 concentrations in both soluble and insoluble portions of peanuts relative to untreated peanuts. The maximum reductions of Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 levels were obtained following 3 hour digestion with alcalase at concentrations of 4.54 and 6.05 U/100 g. Samples obtained under these conditions showed the lowest in vitro IgE-binding and caused the least allergic response in human SPTs. The current study suggests that the allergenic potential of peanuts could be reduced by postharvest processing such as ultrasound-assisted enzymatic treatment of peanuts kernels.

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