Journal Articles

A 6-week diet and exercise intervention alters metabolic syndrome risk factors in obese Chinese children aged 11–13 years

June 28, 2013

A 6-week diet and exercise intervention alters metabolic syndrome risk factors in obese Chinese children aged 11–13 years. Journal of Sport and Health Science. E-pub June 28, 2013. Beibei Luoa, Yang Yang, David C. Nieman, Yajun Zhang, Jie Wang, Ru Wang, Peijie Chen.

Key Laboratory of Exercise and Health Sciences of Ministry of Education, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Municipal Center for Students’ Physical Fitness and Health Surveillance, Shanghai, China; Human Performance Laboratory, Appalachian State University, North Carolina Research Campus; 458th Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Guangzhou, China.

Abstract

Purpose

A randomized, controlled trial was conducted to determine whether a 6-week low calorie diet and aerobic exercise intervention could alter metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk factors in pre-pubescent obese Chinese children.

Methods

The subjects were randomized into diet and exercise (DE) and control (C) groups. The DE group ingested 1600–2000 kcal/day adjusted to each participant’s basal metabolic rate, and engaged in high-volume aerobic exercise (6 days/week, twice daily, for 3 h per session) for 6 weeks. A total of 215 obese children between the ages of 11 and 13 years were recruited into the study, with 167 subjects (DE, n = 95; C, n = 72) completing all phases. Pre- and post-study measures included body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, body fat percentage, blood pressure and other MetS-related markers from fasting blood samples (serum cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, and glucose).

Results

Compared to controls, the DE subjects experienced significantly reduced levels for all outcome markers (p < 0.05), except for fasting blood glucose in boys (p = 0.09).

Conclusion

An intensive, 6-week diet and exercise intervention had favorable effects in altering MetS risk factors in obese Chinese children aged 11 to 13.

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